1% for Open Space - Crested Butte & Gunnison, CO - Saving Paradise Pennies at a Time A

Wildflower Hikes with 1% for Open Space

Do more than just identify the wildflowers! Learn, discover, explore and create in 1% for Open Space’s wildflower hike offerings during the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival.

WILDFLOWERS & SCIENCE EXTRAVAGANZA! 
Choose one or both of the Wildflowers & Science Extravaganzas! Snodgrass: Saturday, July 15. Gothic / Gunsight / Kochevar: Saturday, August 12, 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Discover what scientists at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory are studying! RMBL scientists use wildflowers to understand a range of topics, including pollination dynamics, genetics, climate change, and impacts of invasive species. Join RMBL scientists and 1% for Open Space Executive Director Molly Murfee in any of these full day immersions roaming through various research sites to learn about current research being conducted live on these lands; open space preservation as a key to understanding our physical world; and how these two organizations work together on land conservation for scientific research.

As topics and scientists vary for each Extravaganza, join us for one or both! At least two separate topics by two different scientists are covered in each Extravaganza. Tuition is $120 per Extravaganza with a gourmet sack lunch included. A portion of this workshop’s tuition helps support the work of the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and 1% for Open Space.

Snodgrass: Saturday, July 15, 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 
Topic Range: pollination dynamics, watersheds, climatic data gathering, entomology
Registration: https://crestedbuttewildflowerfestival.configio.com/ShoppingCart.aspx?com=detailview&iid=748&cid=361

Gothic / Gunsight / Kochevar: Saturday, August 12, 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 
Topic Range: pollination dynamics, invasive species, mutualism, climate change, evolution, stream ecology
Registration: https://crestedbuttewildflowerfestival.configio.com/ShoppingCart.aspx?com=detailview&iid=694&cid=374


Indulge in the acts of noticing, visual art and writing in Conversations in Wildflowers Saturday, July 8

CONVERSATIONS IN WILDFLOWERS: A CREATIVE INVESTIGATION & WALK

Indulge in the act of pausing to be fully present in nature. Engage in a conversation with the earth through all of your senses. Connect. Collaborate. Harmonize. Local artist and Certified Nature Connected Coach, Ivy Walker, is joined by writer and executive director of 1% for Open Space Molly Murfee, in a series of visual, written and sensory exercises to really sink in and deepen your unique relationship with the land. Tap into your nature-inspired creativity through reflecting, journaling, and making art with the land, rather than always moving swiftly through it. Use the natural history of wildflowers, site-specific sculpture artists (such as Andy Goldsworthy), environmental writers (such as Terry Tempest Williams), and the inherent metaphor of nature as your muses.

Saturday, July 8, 9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. and tuition is $60.
Registration: https://crestedbuttewildflowerfestival.configio.com/ShoppingCart.aspx?com=detailview&iid=521&cid=365

1% Helps Fund Stewardship Efforts

1% for Open Space voted last week to fund $15,000 to Mountain Manners (a program of the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival) and $15,000 to the Crested Butte Conservation Corps (a program of the Crested Butte Mountain Bike Association) with aspirations of helping to establish commendable local land stewardship efforts by the two organizations, and thereby creating a more sustainable model of tourism.

The primary focus of the Mountain Manners grant is the support of the Peak Protector program. Over Mountain Manners logo30 trained Peak Protectors hit the trail this weekend through Labor Day weekend, educating recreationalists at trailheads, in campgrounds (including dispersed camping zones), and on the trail about low impact travel techniques in our wild places. Additionally, eight Mountain Manners Stewardship courses are being conducted throughout the summer for in depth instruction on the same. The goal of Mountain Manners and Peak Protectors is to educate recreationalists in order to change adverse behavior and practices.

The Crested Butte Conservation Corp is establishing work crews on the ground six days a week, maintaining and repairing damaged trails to prevent resource damage as well as improve the trail experience. While a program of the Crested Butte Mountain Bike Association, the crews will be repairing non-mountain biking trails as well, in addition to assisting with issues in dispersed camping, traffic and parking on thoroughfares leading to backcountry access, and serving as a response team for urgent and present arising situations (such as motorists driving around snow banks and mud bogs).

Both efforts have arisen out of increased visitation to the area causing harmful effects to the land,

Increased visitation has necessitated the upstart of new stewardship efforts Mountain Manners and the Crested Butte Conservation Corps

ecosystems, watershed and trails. Working with governmental agencies such as the United States Forest Service, as well as the private land owners from the Crested Butte Land Trust to ranching operations, the two programs are also working in concert with each other, providing complimentary services towards a very crucial need. Each will be measuring their impacts by recording numbers of interactions with individual recreationists, with Mountain Manners paying special attention to if the education is producing a positive impact on the landscape, and the Conservation Corps additionally weighing pounds of trash collected.

“We cannot continue to market for more people without putting at least equal resources into sustainable tourism efforts such as these,” stated 1%’s executive director Molly Murfee, “No one else is going to take care of our home – it’s up to us. With our grants, 1% wants to make a strong statement and a real difference in getting these programs off the ground. We commend our long-term partner, the Crested Butte Land Trust, for always having stewardship a part of their operations on the lands they own and manage. We see these new efforts as rising to respond to the sheer numbers and their detrimental impacts we’re now feeling across the board on all of our accessible lands. It is no longer enough to just preserve land, we must make very concentrated efforts to steward it as well. This should be a regular part of doing business for all vested parties throughout Gunnison County from this point forward.”

1% for Open Space raises funds through voluntary donations from customers of over 100 participating businesses to help preserve Gunnison County’s open space, recreational opportunities, gorgeous viewsheds, ranching heritage, important ecosystems and valuable watersheds. Since 1997, 1% has collected over $2.7 million to help protect over 12,100 acres in Gunnison County. 1% operates in two project areas – a North Account from Almont North to the High Elk Corridor, and a South Account from Almont through to Gunnison – directly funded by the donations collected by participating businesses in that specific area.

Mountain Manners Stewardship Courses

Do you love being in the backcountry but don’t know if you’re “doing it right?” This summer, the local Mountain Manners logoeducation and stewardship effort, Mountain Manners, is offering a variety of courses based in the Leave No TraceTM tenets to give you the low-down on low-environmental impact travel through wild, fragile places. Hikers, bikers, backpackers and car campers – come get smart about bringing the right gear; trail etiquette; choosing the best lunch and camp sites; making a low impact fire; preserving flora and fauna; “toilet” practices; dealing with trash; preserving water quality and more.

Eight classes – all conducted outdoors – are offered June through August taught by instructors Molly Murfee and Gillian Rossi. To fully address a variety of needs a mixture of time commitments, activities and price points are available. All classes are complemented by reference materials and fun swag to take home. Classes tailored for specific groups (such as hunters, fisherpeople, river runners, motorized users and more) are also available upon request.

Mountain Manners was created as a response from locals about “loving our public lands to death.” Collaboratively conceived and sponsored by the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival, Mountain Manners serve as a relatable, easy to remember, fun and eye-catching educational campaign to teach recreators about outdoor etiquette. Mountain Manners also sponsors Peak Protectors, a training for local citizens to educate recreators about proper outdoor etiquette while on the trails.

Register for any Mountain Manners Stewardship Course through the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival online at www.crestedbuttewildflowerfestival.com. Go to the “Events” tab, then “Mountain Manners Stewardship Classes” on the drop-down menu. You may also register by phone at (970) 349-2571. All courses begin at the 4-way stop / Visitor Center in Crested Butte on the NE Corner of Elk Avenue and Sixth Street (Hwy 135), except for the July 9 offering which meets at the Crested Butte Community School at 818 Red Lady Avenue in Crested Butte. Be prepared to carpool except for the Mountain Manners for Mountain Bikes which will bike from the 4-way.

SUMMER 2017 COURSE OFFERINGSDown & Dirty Locals' Mountain Manners

Down & Dirty Locals’ Mountain Manners: Offered early in the season for locals to learn how to treat our “crib” right!

Saturday, June 3. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. $35. Instructor: Molly Murfee

 

 

Mountain Manners Wildflower & Natural History Hike: These three-quarters day hikes allow plenty of time to learn local wildflowers and natural history, and see the gorgeous terrain of the area through a guided hike, while additionally acquiring Mountain Manners and Leave No TraceTM skills.

Saturday, June 17. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. $75. Instructor: Gillian Rossi; Sunday, July 9. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. $75. Instructor: Molly Murfee; Friday, August 11. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. $75. Instructor: Molly Murfee

Mountain Manners for Mountain BikesMountain Manners for Mountain Bikes: Held during Crested Butte Bike Week, this class is for mountain bikers in a succinct format so you can squeeze in another ride later in the day! Bring own bike, ready to ride.

Sunday, June 25. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. $40. Instructor: Molly Murfee

 

Mountain Manners Half Day Hike: The shorter half day hike allows you to focus exclusively on the Mountain Manners skills you came to learn, allows for an affordable entry point, and still leaves you with the rest of the day to fill as you please!

           Wednesday, July 19. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. $40. Instructor: Gillian Rossi

           Wednesday, July 26. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. $40. Instructor: Gillian Rossi

 Mountain Manners Car Camping & Campfire: Learn methodologies to selecting durable car camping and campfire sites; building low impact fires; cooking; dealing with dishwater and trash; “toilet practices” and other strategies to making your car camping experience the best all around. Bring adult campfire beverages and snacks if you desire for chatting around the fire afterwards. Please note this is not an overnight event.

Wednesday, August 2. 4 p.m. – 8 p.m. $50. Instructor: Gillian Rossi

 Mountain Manners is sponsored by the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival

Wildflower Fest Logo Vertical

1% for Open Space Provides Seed Money for Mountain Manners

1% for Open Space has recently funded seed money for the inaugural launch of the new community-driven Gunnison Valley stewardship campaign, Mountain Manners.

Mountain Manners aims to raise awareness for responsible recreation in the wild and natural areas in Gunnison County to “preserve the beauty that brought you here.” The low impact backcountry travel code of ethics and outreach is the collaborative brainchild of over 30 different agencies and individuals brought together by the Sustainable Recreation and Tourism branch of the One Valley Prosperity Project.

Lower Loop Bikers and Hikers

Gunnison County sees over 3.4 million visitors per year in our forests and wildlands.

While in its infancy, Mountain Manners will continue to grow and evolve in response to user impacts seen in our wild spaces. The inaugural efforts include creation of: a localized code of ethics specific to this area with informational website; recognizable logo for messaging; informational slogan stickers each with a “Mountain Manner” tip; fun and friendly “conversational give aways” such as lip balm, water bottles, beer coasters and more – all with educational pointers.

Mountain Manners also inspires to instigate a Field Ambassador Program where volunteers agree to help spread the message of responsible use on the trail and in the moment of finding someone behaving disrespectfully. Field Ambassadors will be equipped with the knowledge of a responsible code of ethics in the backcountry, the impacts a particular action has, and how to relay that information in a friendly but firm manner.

“We really want to applaud the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival who applied to us for these funds. They really are the energetic and logistical impetus in making this happen,” says 1% for Open Space executive director Molly Murfee, “1% for Open Space’s historical main drive has always been the outright preservation of our wild lands and recreational access through purchases and easements. Yet, the national forest that surrounds us here in Gunnison County experiences 3.4 million visitors annually. It is one thing to preserve the land, we must all come together as a community to become good stewards of it and work to protect its integrity. We believe that Mountain Manners is a step in the right direction towards this, and we want to support this valley-wide effort. We are proud to be a founding partner and look forward to the campaign’s evolution.”

Look for Mountain Manners information at participating 1% for Open Space businesses, among other locales, and stay tuned for the developing website and code of ethics informational dissemination. For more information on 1% for Open Space see www.1percentforopenspace.org where a list of low impact backcountry travel techniques can also be found at www.1percentforopenspace.org/low-impact-travel-techniques/

 

Low Impact Travel Techniques

Have some Mountain Manners

(And Don’t Love the Wilderness to Death)

Low Impact Ethics for Backcountry Travel

 

Remember while you’re traveling – while this may be just a weekend or a week for you, someone else will fill your traveling shoes when you leave. The cumulative impact of millions of visitors on our wildlands can have a seriously negative impact on the soil, plants, water and wildlife of the area. These low impact ethics will help you travel responsibly through this beautiful landscape. 

Love the Whole Experience

Use tools like binoculars to see wildlife and scenery up close without scaring animals or trampling plants

Use tools like binoculars to see wildlife and scenery up close without scaring animals or trampling plants

  • Get some good hiking boots or trail shoes
    • Waterproof hiking boots allow you to march through any condition the trail presents and still keep your feet dry.
  • Invest in some gaiters
    • These go over the top of your boots so water can’t leak in.
  • Get a good camera and binoculars
    • Take good pictures of wildlife and wildflowers, or see them up close, without having to scare the animals or trample the plants in order to get that great shot or view.
  • Get some wildflower, plant and tracking guides
    • Enhance your experience by learning more about this incredible land you are traveling through.

Love the plants

  • Stay on the trail
    Travel on durable surfaces such as trails, roads and rock to avoid crushing plants

    Travel on durable surfaces such as trails, roads and rock to avoid crushing plants

    • If you encounter a muddy or snowy spot, use those great new boots and gaiters and tromp right through it. Walking around muddy and snowy spots enlarges the trail, creates multiple trails in one area, causes both erosion and compaction, and kills all those beautiful flowers and plants you came to see.
    • Walk in a single file on the trail so as not to widen it
    • When encountering other people on the trail, “pull off” the trail only on durable surfaces such as dirt, gravel or rocks, and completely stop to let the others pass. Do not trample the plants just to get out of someone’s way.

 

 

 

 

Stay on the road

    • Do not drive out into our gorgeous meadows, no matter how easy it may be or fun it looks. This destroys plant life, compacts the soil, creates erosion, is extremely unsightly and makes a general enormous and often irrevocable mess of things.
    • When parking at trailheads, do not drive out onto the grass, flowers and meadows to create a space. Find a space to leave your car on pre-established parking spots. Squeeze in if necessary, being in tight and slightly inconvenient parking is better than destroying the wilderness.
  • Use only established campsites
    • Don’t start branching out into untrammeled ground. Keep your campsite tight, making sure you conduct all your activities of washing dishes, sleeping, hanging out, etc. off of vegetation
  • Break on durable surfaces
    • Chose a rock or bare ground off the trail for snack breaks and lunch.

Love the water

  • Urinate at least 200 feet from lakes and streams
    Conduct all activities - such as camping, washing dishes, cooking, urinating and defecating 200 feet away from any body of water.

    Conduct all activities – such as camping, washing dishes, cooking, urinating and defecating 200 feet away from any body of water.

    • Try to focus on unvegetated areas. Animals are attracted to the salts in our urine and may defoliate plants in order to get the salts.
  • Deposit solid human waste in catholes
    • Dig a small hole 6 to 8 inches deep, at least 200 feet from water, camp and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished.
  • Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products
    • A great way to do this is to stick a used coffee sack in your pack. Put your used products in the coffee sack, roll the whole bundle in a plastic bag, put it in your pack, and toss it when you reach civilization again.
  • Camp at least 200 feet from lakes and streams
  • Wash dishes and yourself at least 200 feet from lakes and streams
    • Carry water to your washing spot, use small amounts of biodegradable soap, scatter strained dishwater over an unvegetated area so as not to attract animals who might subsequently eat the plants.

 Love the Earth

  • Pack it in, pack it out
    • Inspect your campsite, break or lunch area for trash you might have spilled. Pick up any food scraps or litter and pack it out. Be extra careful of the small items like twist ties, candy wrappers or cigarette butts.
    • Modern human food is not a natural occurrence in the backcountry. Leaving it behind can attract animals, which in turn become accustomed to humans. Animals that are accustomed to humans, especially bears, are often killed to avoid animal-human interactions. Pack out all leftover food, cooking grease or any material used to cook food, such as aluminum foil.
    • Packing it out includes things like orange peels, apple cores, or pistachio shells. These items appear as food to animals.
    • Stuffing some extra plastic bags in your pack or vehicle is a great way to make sure you can carry out your trash comfortably.
    • If you see someone else’s trash, pick it up and pack it out. Think about the health of the landscape and the experience of future visitors and this becomes an easy and rewarding task.
  • Especially pack out your toilet paper
    • Do not, under any circumstances, leave your toilet paper in the backcountry. Do not lay it on the ground or bury it. Animals will get into it and strew it everywhere. It is unsightly for other visitors, extremely unhygienic and it is litter. It will not disintegrate quickly in our cold environment. You wouldn’t throw litter out your car window, why would you do the equivalent in our backcountry? Gross. Put it in a bag or coffee sack and deposit in a trash receptacle back in civilization.
  • Plan and pack your meals and snacks so as to avoid litter
    • Leave excess packaging at home. Avoid small things that can easily fall out of your pocket – like twist ties.

Love the Wildness

Don't pick the wildflowers. Leave them as they are most importantly so they can continue to reproduce; and secondly so others may enjoy them

Don’t pick the wildflowers. Leave them as they are most importantly so they can continue to reproduce; and secondly so others may enjoy them

  • Leave the wildflowers
    • Do not, under any circumstances, pick the wildflowers. Flowers are the way in which plants reproduce and if you pick them, you threaten their very survival. Wildflowers hate being picked anyway and will not last in a vase in your house. They were made to be wild. Plus, as the Wildflower Capital of Colorado, Crested Butte and the surrounding area depends on these flowers for tourism, and therefore our income.
  • Respect the wildlife
    • Don’t feed or approach wildlife. This includes chipmunks or birds that might seem interested in you, or even appear to having been fed before. Feeding wildlife alters their behaviors, making them accustomed to humans and therefore open to harm. They may lose their ability to find food on their own, which may cost them their lives when humans aren’t around.
    • When camping, store food so that animals cannot get into it. Hang your food in a stuff sack in a nearby tree.
  • Honor the rocks and trees
    • Do not carve into rocks or trees. Carving into the bark of trees opens them up to disease and alters the wilderness experience for others. Carving into rocks is just plain obnoxious.

 

Love Your Neighbors

  • Plan to travel in a small group
    • Most folks visit our backcountry to get away from other people and noise, and find some solitude and quiet. Large groups can be a hindrance to this need.
    • If you’re traveling in a large group, break up into smaller groups and hike a good distance away from each other, or take different trails altogether
  • Give folks some space
    Travel in small groups and give folks some space so everyone can enjoy a piece of solitude and quiet on the trail.

    Travel in small groups and give folks some space so everyone can enjoy a piece of solitude and quiet on the trail.

    • Keep your distance from other recreationalists so they may enjoy the solitude and silence of the wilderness on their own terms.
    • There is no need to be on someone else’s heels. Take a break, eat a snack, snap a photo and let the distance between you widen.
    • Find your own spot. If you are lunching, taking a break, or camping, pull off the trail and break away from other people to help maintain the quality of their experience. Use durable surfaces such as a rock or bare ground for your breaks.
  • Listen to nature
    • We all understand the primal urge to howl at the moon or hear your own echo bounce through the valley. But please respect the desires of others for silence and solitude and keep your human made noises down.
    • Many come to the wilderness to get away from technology. Turn any gadgets you’re carrying with you such as cell phones off or on silence. Avoid yacking away, if you even can get a signal, around other people.

Love Making a Proper Fire

  • Know if any fire restrictions are in place
    • We live in an extremely arid place. Your carelessness of building a fire during dangerous conditions can literally threaten our homes, forests and livelihoods.
  • Use only existing fire rings
    • The intense, concentrated heat of a campfire sterilizes the ground beneath it making it hard if not impossible for plants to regrow in that space for many, many years. Avoid at all costs making a fire ring next to a pre-existing fire ring. This is absurd and just damages more and more soil, thereby making the spot undesirable for humans, plants and animals
  • Keep fires small
    • Use only dead and downed wood. Do not cut branches from trees or bushes, dead or alive. A good size for firewood is about the size of your wrist, or something that can be broken easily with your bare hands.
  • Put it out completely
  • Use a lightweight stove for backcountry cooking and enjoy a candle lantern for light.

This guide is by no means comprehensive and there are many techniques to developing and instilling a true wilderness ethic of respect and proper behavior within yourself and your travel companions. A good resource for more detailed information on low impact travel ethics is through the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics website at www.lnt.org. In particular click on the “Learn” tab, then scroll to the “Seven Principles” link. If you use motors to experience the wildlands around us, check out www.treadlightly.org for more specific information in that area. Click on “Education” then “Learn” then “Recreation Tips” for a good place to begin according to your sport.

Originally printed in the Crested Butte Magazine summer 2015 edition, page 105. For a direct electronic link to the article visit: http://issuu.com/crestedbuttemagazine/docs/cbms15_digital_linked_small/107?e=1473410/13026661

For the corresponding article entitled, “Why We Need Wilderness” on page 96 of the Crested Butte Magazine summer 2015 edition visit: http://issuu.com/crestedbuttemagazine/docs/cbms15_digital_linked_small/99?e=1473410/13026661

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1% Wins Legacy Award

1% for Open Space recently received the Crested Butte – Mt. Crested Butte Chamber of Commerce’s

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1% for Open Space wins the Legacy Award for over 10 years of service from the Crested Butte – Mt. Crested Butte Chamber of Commerce

Legacy Business of the year! We are incredibly proud and honored to receive this award.

It is particularly significant to 1% to receive this award from an entity dedicated to business success. We raise our grant funds through the efforts of our 100 participating businesses who donate their time in collecting a voluntary 1% donation from their customers. Their vote of confidence is immeasurably meaningful to us.

The Legacy Award is given to those who conducted business in the valley for over 10 years. It also calls us to ask – “What does it mean to be a legacy?”

For 1% for Open Space it means that through nearly two decades of our work, we have raised over 2.4 million dollars, granted to eight different community organizations, for the  permanent preservation of over 12,000 acres through 45 separate projects – all exclusively in Gunnison County. These include such prominent projects as the Lower Loop, Lupine Trail (on the Kochevar Parcel), and Paradise Divide Basin. We’ve helped generational ranchers continue their economies and way of life by funding conservation easements on working ranches with families such as Trampe, Rozman, Peterson and Guerrieri. Recreational access has been secured with projects such as the Gunnison Whitewater Park and Baxter Gulch Trail.

Being a legacy means that we’ve stood the test of time, proving ourselves to be dependable, accountable and reputable. And so we are also proud to have partnered with entities such as the Crested Butte Land Trust, Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy, Trust for Public Land, Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, Town of Crested Butte, Gunnison County, Trout Unlimited and the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival. The work we have done together means that much of our natural heritage in Gunnison County is preserved forever.

Thank you to all of the businesses who truly comprise this program, who make a statement through their participation that taking care of business also means taking care of the most vital entity that sustains our business – these landscapes that serve as our physical, economic and emotional haven and essential resource.

1% Pledges to Trampe Ranch Conservation Project

1% for Open Space has recently pledged monetary support to the Trampe Ranch Conservation Project

The Trampe Ranch boasts some of the most spectacular viewsheds in the county

The Trampe Ranch boasts some of the most spectacular viewsheds in the county

through a joint partnership of the Trust for Public Land and the Nature Conservancy. The 1% grant of $200,000 will help permanently preserve nearly 6,000 highly visible acres throughout the Gunnison Valley. The East River parcels total 2,647 acres, the Jack’s Cabin parcel is 284 acres (joining an already preserved 978 acres), and the Home Ranch just north of Gunnison is 1,917 acres.

“This is one of the most exciting projects I have ever been a part of since I moved here,” says Glo Cunningham, 1% for Open Space Board President, “It is so important to protect these amazing ranchlands and viewsheds. Huge kudos go out to Bill Trampe, Susan Lohr, Justin Spring and the Trust for Public Land along with the Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy for all their hard work.”

The Trampe Ranch helps to preserve our agrarian culture, rural lifestyle and pastoral landscape quintessential to this area’s identity and economic viability

The Trampe Ranch helps to preserve our agrarian culture, rural lifestyle and pastoral landscape quintessential to this area’s identity and economic viability.

Bill Trampe is a third generation rancher, co-founder of the Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy, and runs one of the largest cow / calf and yearling operations in the region, accounting for approximately 20 percent of Gunnison County’s annual agricultural productivity. His goal in permanently preserving his land in conservation easements is to provide an enduring natural resource base for agriculture so that the business of producing food will continue to be sustainable forever.

The Trampe Ranch also boasts some of the most spectacular viewsheds in the county, covering over 30 miles of landscape-scale terrain. Moreover, it serves as important habitat for the Gunnison Sage-Grouse with lek, brood rearing and winter range territories. Trampe shares the ranch with elk, mule deer, black bear, mountain lions, many smaller mammals, and numerous migratory and resident birds, including 13 raptor species.

In addition to the permitted and primary use of agriculture, the Trampe Ranch conservation easements

The Trampe Ranch covers nearly 6,000 acres in the Crested Butte, Almont and Gunnison areas

The Trampe Ranch covers nearly 6,000 acres in the Crested Butte, Almont and Gunnison areas

will also allow for guided and outfitted hunting and fishing; ecological research; seasonal outdoor activities or events; and educational activities promoting agriculture and natural resources – all exclusively by permission of the landowner and provided they do not harm the grazing and agricultural uses of the land or violate the Conservation Easement.

“The Trust for Public Land is honored to work on the Trampe Ranch conservation easement,” says Colorado Director of Land Protection for TPL Justin Spring, “This is one of the most significant projects ever tackled in Colorado and vital to the community character of Gunnison County. ”

The Trampe Ranch Conservation Project addresses several core values of 1% for Open Space that guide the organization’s funding. These include the preservation of Gunnison County’s ranching heritage, gorgeous viewsheds, wildlife habitat, watersheds and important ecosystems. In addition to the ecosystem services the land provides, protection of the Trampe Ranch helps to preserve our agrarian culture, rural lifestyle and pastoral landscape quintessential to this area’s identity and economic viability.

“Words do not express the profound respect we at 1% for Open Space have for Bill Trampe and his utter and heartfelt connection to the land he has stewarded throughout his lifetime,” says Executive Director Molly Murfee, “On a recent funders’ site visit, over and over people came up to him to say ‘thank you.’ His consistent response was ‘It’s not about me, it’s about the land.’ This kind of dedicated ethic is regrettably rare in today’s world, and we are incredibly fortunate in the Gunnison Country to have someone like Trampe whose ultimate vision includes preservation of the land and dedication to the crucial issue of food security.”

Parcels of the Trampe Ranch to be permanently preserved in Crested Butte, Almont and Gunnison

Parcels of the Trampe Ranch to be permanently preserved in Crested Butte, Almont and Gunnison

The Trampe Ranch Conservation Project is scheduled to close December 2016. For personal donations towards the project please visit the Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Legacy’s website at www.gunnisonlegacy.org or contact Scott Dissel at the Trust for Public Land at 303-867-2337.

1 Percent for Open Space logo

About 1% for Open Space 

1% for Open Space raises funds through voluntary donations from customers of over 100 participating businesses to help preserve Gunnison County’s open space, ranching heritage, gorgeous viewsheds, wildlife habitat, watersheds, important ecosystems, and recreational opportunities. Since 1997, 1% has collected over $2.4 million to help protect over 12,100 acres in Gunnison County.

1% for Open Space works exclusively in Gunnison County and operates on two separate accounts. Businesses in the northern end of the valley raise funds for open space projects north of Almont. Businesses in the southern end of the valley raise funds for projects including Almont and south. 1% will be drawing funds for the Trampe Ranch Conservation Project from both their northern and southern accounts, meaning participating businesses from Gunnison, to Crested Butte, to Mt. Crested Butte have raised the funds for this project.

1% for Open Space is now in its Spring Sign Up Season through June 17. Become an integral part of historic projects such as the permanent protection of the Trampe Ranch. Interested businesses should contact Executive Director Molly Murfee for a free coffee date and information session. For more information visit www.1percentforopenspace.org, call 970-349-1775, or write to director@1percentforopenspace.org.

 

 

Wildflowers & Science Extravaganza! An Educational Hike with 1% for Open Space and Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Join 1% for Open Space executive director Molly Murfee and Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory scientists on an educational hike in the wildflowers in “Wildflowers & Science Extravaganza!” Saturday, August 15, both from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Discover what world class scientists at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory are studying! RMBL scientists use wildflowers to understand a range of topics, including pollination dynamics; how complex traits like diabetes are controlled by genes; and how organisms will respond to a changing

Science at work on the North Pole Basin Property. 158 acres permanently preserved in 2013 with help from 1% for Open Space funds.

Science at work on the North Pole Basin Property. 158 acres permanently preserved in 2013 with help from 1% for Open Space funds.

climate. Join RMBL scientists and 1% for Open Space Executive Director Molly Murfee in this full day immersion to roam through the three separate permanently protected lands of North Pole Basin, Schofield Park and Maxfield (or Gothic) Meadows. Learn about: current research being conducted live on these lands; open space preservation as a key to understanding our physical world; and how these two organizations work together on land conservation for scientific research. Enjoy a gourmet sack lunch in the Gothic townsite followed by a historic tour of the research laboratory grounds with some time to peruse the gift shop. A portion of this workshop’s tuition helps support the work of the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and 1% for Open Space.

Day & Time:  

Saturday, August 15, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Price: $110 includes gourmet lunch

Held in conjunction with the Art Studio and Crested Butte Wildflower Festival. Register at www.crestedbuttewildflowerfestival.com or (970) 349-2571 .

Hike Highlights & Scientist Bios:

Dr. Jill Anderson studies climate change and its effect on plants at the garden plot in North Pole Basin

Dr. Jill Anderson studies climate change and its effect on plants at the garden plot in North Pole Basin

Dr. Jill Anderson, Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics and Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia will speak about her research in North Pole Basin and Schofield Park during our Saturday, August 15 hike. Here’s a preview of the research she’ll be talking about:

Modern reliance on fossil fuels has ushered in extreme temperatures globally and abnormal precipitation patterns in many regions. Climate change exposes natural communities to novel stresses, and increases the risk of extinction. In this tour, we will discuss the short- and long-term consequences of changing climates. Scientists can test biological consequences of climate change through various procedures, including experimental manipulations of temperature and water stress, and experimental gardens across climatic gradients (such as elevation). We will visit a study that combines these methods to discuss experimental design and results.

 

 

 

Dr. Rosemary Smith, Professor of Biology, Idaho State University, and long-time RMBL Researcher will speak to her research in Maxfield Meadows at the Saturday, August 15 hike. Find out what she’s discovering! Here’s a preview to her research:

The Maxfield Meadow is the site of a long-term small mammal population census. Each year we set up a

Dr. Rosemary Smith studies rodent populations and their impact on predators at the Maxfield Meadows research site

Dr. Rosemary Smith studies rodent populations and their impact on predators at the Maxfield Meadows research site

rodent-trapping grid, using live-traps. For 8-10 nights each summer we bait and set the traps, then remove the live animals in the morning. Each animal is identified to species (deer mouse, vole, jumping mouse), weighed, marked, and released. We have found that rodent populations can fluctuate dramatically from year to year; and this influences the species that depend on them for food.

 

 

 

Wildflower Hike with 1% for Open Space

Join 1% for Open Space executive director Molly Murfee for a “Happy Hour Sunset Saunter” Wednesday, June 24 from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Learn early season wildflowers and wildflower succession as well as about the marvelous fundraising engine of 1% for Open Space

Learn early season wildflowers and wildflower succession as well as about the marvelous fundraising engine of 1% for Open Space

Experience the magic of the Woods Walk as you never have before. In the first throes of summer, the best blooms begin here before crawling their way up the valley. Learn the lore of early season wildflower species as they glow through the peak lighting ambiance. Stop to drink it all in, and savor a gourmet happy hour picnic with local wines and fine regionally sourced appetizers. From this glorious starting point, Molly explains how this gem is the gateway to a world of lovingly and permanently preserved open space lands you can access.

Perfect for proud 1% customers who want to learn more about the program’s funded projects; local business owners interested in becoming participants; participating businesses who want to learn more about what they’ve helped save; and conservation enthusiasts wishing to start similar programs in their hometowns.

Registration is $50 and includes locally sourced wines and appetizers. A portion of the proceeds from this divine wildflower experience helps support 1% for Open Space. Held in conjunction with the Crested Butte Wildflower Festival. To register visit www.crestedbuttewildflowerfestival.com. For more information on 1% for Open Space visit www.1percentforopenspace.org.

1% Pledges to Snodgrass Land Preservation Project

1% for Open Space has recently pledged its monetary support to the Crested Butte Land Trust’s Snodgrass project with a grant of $125,000. This land conservation effort will permanently preserve 110 acres on the eastern flank of Snodgrass Mountain as well as access to the Snodgrass Trailhead. The entire project consists of Parcels 1 (96 acres) and 2 (9.29 acres) of the Promontory Ranch as well as the new addition of the Ingraham Parcel (4.95 acres).

“For 1% the Snodgrass project carries the same value and magnitude of importance as that of the Lower Loop,” says 1% for Open Space Executive Director Molly Murfee, “What we know of Snodgrass is the trailhead that will be permanently preserved. Of equal value, however, is the gorgeous land that stretches north of the trailhead. Here are expanses of wildflower meadows, aspen forests, streams and views from Gothic Mountain to Bellview. It’s stunning.”

For 1% for Open Space, the project addresses several of the core values that guide their funding decisions. In this project, access to recreational opportunities is paramount with Snodgrass Mountain containing one of the important and widely used trains in the area alongside its renowned summer wildflower display.

As the acreage is perched at the northern end of the proposed development with its  northern border being shared by the Gunnison National Forest, it serves as an additional buffer between the growing town of Mt. Crested Butte and the town of Gothic, home of the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory.

In additional to the recreational value of permanently securing access to the Snodgrass trailhead, the project also helps protect valuable resting, foraging and migration habitat for black bear, deer, elk, moose, coyote, fox, mountain lion and beavers, among other wildlife. Upper portions of Snodgrass Mountain are identified as habitat for the endangered Canada lynx. Three streams travel through the project area feeding both into Washington Gulch and the East River, their protection therefore addressing 1%’s value of preserving watershed integrity.

1% for Open Space raises funds through voluntary donations from customers of over 100 participating businesses to help preserve Gunnison County’s open space, recreational opportunities, gorgeous viewsheds, ranching heritage and important ecosystems. Since 1997, 1% has collected over $2 million to help protect over 5,100 acres in Gunnison County.

Funds for the Snodgrass land preservation project were raised exclusively by participating 1% for Open Space businesses in the Crested Butte area.

“I really want to encourage business owners who value amenities – from recreational to wildlife to watershed – such as exist within the Snodgrass project, to become a participating member of 1%,” says continues Murfee, “The more businesses we have and the more support they feel from their donating customers, the more money we will have to donate to projects such as this.”

1% for Open Space is now in its Fall Sign Up Season through December 12. Interested businesses should get in touch with Executive Director Molly Murfee for a free coffee date and information session. For more information on 1%  for Open Space visit www.1percentforopenspace.org , call 970-349-1775 or write at director@1percentforopenspace.org.