Wildflowers & Science Extravaganza! An Educational Hike with 1% for Open Space and Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

Join 1% for Open Space executive director Molly Murfee and Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory scientists on an educational hike in the wildflowers in “Wildflowers & Science Extravaganza!” Saturday, August 15, both from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Discover what world class scientists at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory are studying! RMBL scientists use wildflowers to understand a range of topics, including pollination dynamics; how complex traits like diabetes are controlled by genes; and how organisms will respond to a changing

Science at work on the North Pole Basin Property. 158 acres permanently preserved in 2013 with help from 1% for Open Space funds.

Science at work on the North Pole Basin Property. 158 acres permanently preserved in 2013 with help from 1% for Open Space funds.

climate. Join RMBL scientists and 1% for Open Space Executive Director Molly Murfee in this full day immersion to roam through the three separate permanently protected lands of North Pole Basin, Schofield Park and Maxfield (or Gothic) Meadows. Learn about: current research being conducted live on these lands; open space preservation as a key to understanding our physical world; and how these two organizations work together on land conservation for scientific research. Enjoy a gourmet sack lunch in the Gothic townsite followed by a historic tour of the research laboratory grounds with some time to peruse the gift shop. A portion of this workshop’s tuition helps support the work of the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory and 1% for Open Space.

Day & Time:  

Saturday, August 15, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Price: $110 includes gourmet lunch

Held in conjunction with the Art Studio and Crested Butte Wildflower Festival. Register at www.crestedbuttewildflowerfestival.com or (970) 349-2571 .

Hike Highlights & Scientist Bios:

Dr. Jill Anderson studies climate change and its effect on plants at the garden plot in North Pole Basin

Dr. Jill Anderson studies climate change and its effect on plants at the garden plot in North Pole Basin

Dr. Jill Anderson, Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics and Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia will speak about her research in North Pole Basin and Schofield Park during our Saturday, August 15 hike. Here’s a preview of the research she’ll be talking about:

Modern reliance on fossil fuels has ushered in extreme temperatures globally and abnormal precipitation patterns in many regions. Climate change exposes natural communities to novel stresses, and increases the risk of extinction. In this tour, we will discuss the short- and long-term consequences of changing climates. Scientists can test biological consequences of climate change through various procedures, including experimental manipulations of temperature and water stress, and experimental gardens across climatic gradients (such as elevation). We will visit a study that combines these methods to discuss experimental design and results.

 

 

 

Dr. Rosemary Smith, Professor of Biology, Idaho State University, and long-time RMBL Researcher will speak to her research in Maxfield Meadows at the Saturday, August 15 hike. Find out what she’s discovering! Here’s a preview to her research:

The Maxfield Meadow is the site of a long-term small mammal population census. Each year we set up a

Dr. Rosemary Smith studies rodent populations and their impact on predators at the Maxfield Meadows research site

Dr. Rosemary Smith studies rodent populations and their impact on predators at the Maxfield Meadows research site

rodent-trapping grid, using live-traps. For 8-10 nights each summer we bait and set the traps, then remove the live animals in the morning. Each animal is identified to species (deer mouse, vole, jumping mouse), weighed, marked, and released. We have found that rodent populations can fluctuate dramatically from year to year; and this influences the species that depend on them for food.

 

 

 

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